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In recent years, mindfulness and other spiritual terms have become popular in modern psychology.  Although these tools can be very effective, many individuals struggle with how to become “mindful” in the midst of a chaotic and high-pressured world, where constant deadlines exist, and culture and society don’t always encourage mindful nor spiritual approaches.  In general, although some of these tools seem positive and exciting in theory, they can feel impossible or contrary to practice in daily routines, and many will give up.

A big part of how I approach mindfulness therapy and spiritual resources in counseling is understanding your own history, as well as spiritual life.  Often your past or current spiritual practices, family/childhood religious training, as well as your losses and trauma, may be foundational.  Understanding what is most personally meaningful to your values as a client, and not just what is “popular”, and encouraged in common culture, is essential.  Indeed, research shows that spiritual life tools (such as mindfulness and contemplation) are important, but it is vital that this application be personally meaningful.  With that interior nuance, spiritual tools can become daily anchors, which ultimately give you grounding, and a connection to your greater values.

I am grateful that much of my clinical training in becoming a psychologist has been understanding a client’s spiritual life.  Much of my own practice and research has been based on spiritual well-being, and individual images of God. I also received additional training as a pastoral counselor who honors all faiths (from Eastern contemplatives to Western Christianity).  If you are interested in connection to this part of yourself as a means to psychological well-being, please reach out. I would embrace this opportunity to companion you on your spiritual journey.

Suggested Good Reads

Interior Freedom.  Fr. Jacques Philipe

Man’s Search for Meaning.  Dr. Victor Frankel

Stillness Speaks.  Eckhart Tolle